Guitar News

Jack & Elle Davisson Play Ginastera & Dyens

This is Classical Guitar - Thu, 10/22/2020 - 12:06

Jack Davisson (14) plays Sonata for Guitar, Op. 47 by Alberto Ginastera (1916-1983) and Elle Davisson (11) plays Songe Capricorne by Roland Dyens (1955-2016). Jack’s video comes from their Davisson Guitar Duo Youtube channel and Elle’s video comes via  Siccas Guitars Media and their YouTube channel.

Both Jack and Elle study with Christopher Mallett at the California Conservatory of Music so a big congrats to Christopher as well for instilling a strong technique but one that is also sensitive to musicality. Great playing by both of these exciting youth players. Nice pacing and sense of space by Jack as well as some controlled aggressive flourishes in the Finale and elsewhere. It’s a tough work and his musical maturity is already very well developed. Congrats! Elle does a great job with the Dyens with excellent phrasing and sense of momentum and growth. She also nicely brings out the harmonic richness and charming little figurations that Dyens loved so much. Some impressive playing in the virtuosic sections in this work as well. Looking forward to seeing more of these two young artists. They also play a duo, here’s a live performance via their YouTube.

 

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Lesson: Prelude-Presto, Suite in E Minor, BWV 996 by Bach

This is Classical Guitar - Mon, 10/19/2020 - 12:25

Lesson: Prelude (Praeludio) and Presto from Suite in E Minor, BWV 996 by Bach

Here’s the first lesson for my edition of the Suite in E Minor, BWV 996. In this video I cover the Prelude and Presto fugue. Mainly an overview video to get some ideas flowing. Here’s the Youtube Lesson Link if you want to watch it there. Below is the edition info.

Suite in E Minor, BWV 996 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) – PDF sheet music for classical guitar. Comes with both a notation-only edition and a tab edition. Left hand fingering. PDF Download. The overall level is advanced but certain movements are easier than others. Movements: Praeludio-Presto, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Bourrée, Gigue. Popularly known as a Lute Suite but possibly written for the lute-harpsichord (lautenwerk), an uncommon Baroque keyboard instrument. In terms of the manuscript, performance difficulty, key signature, and suitability, this is more similar to a keyboard composition. However, the overall lighter texture compared to his keyboard works hints at the texture capable by a lute. Nevertheless, modern guitar players have embraced the work and have found various arranging solutions for successful performance. Read more info in my Preface to this edition in both the free and fingered editions below. The Bouree is also available as a free score.

 

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Categories: Guitar News

Reginald Mobley and Stephen Stubbs Perform Robert Johnson

This is Classical Guitar - Sat, 10/17/2020 - 12:25

Absolutely charming. Reginald L. Mobley (countertenor) and Stephen Stubbs (lute) perform Full Fathom Five, composed by Robert Johnson (c.1583–1633) with text by William Shakespeare (The Tempest). This comes via the Pacific MusicWorks on their YouTube. I’ve seen both Mobley and Stubbs perform on numerous occasions via Pacific MusicWorks in small and large ensembles and they are always fantastic. But it’s great to hear two of my favourite performers as a duo. Mobley has exquisite vocal and musical abilities and charming performance presence. Stubbs is a colossal musical figure with equally brilliant skills on the lute, guitar, conducting, and simultaneously conducting while on the lute, theorbo, or harpsichord. He’s won a Grammy for best Opera recording and is a specialist in Baroque opera and song. I can’t say enough good things, check it out.

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Categories: Guitar News

Lesson: Alignment & Slur Exercise with Fixed Fingers

This is Classical Guitar - Sat, 10/17/2020 - 11:46



Alignment and Closed Slurs (using fixed fingers) – This is from page 84 in my technique book (link below). Place the indicated fixed fingers on the third string and hold down for the entire line. Do not play the fixed fingers, only hold your fingers on the string. Play the indicated slurred notes. Make sure you have covered some other basic slur exercises first as this is more at the intermediate level.

For those using the book: Place the indicated fingers on the notes marked with an X and hold down for the entire line. Do not play the notes with an X, only hold your fingers on the string. Play the slurred notes of the following bar.

This exercise is from page 84 in my book Classical Guitar Technique: Essential Exercises, Scales, and ArpeggiosThe 122 page book includes: Practice Routines, Tips, 100 Open String Exercises, 120 Giuliani Arpeggios, Scales, Slur Exercises, Shifts, Finger Independence, Barre, Tremolo, Common Harmonics, and much more. YouTube Video Link.

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Categories: Guitar News

Canadian Guitar Quartet Plays Roux

This is Classical Guitar - Fri, 10/16/2020 - 15:44

The fantastic Canadian Guitar Quartet with Julien Bisaillon, Renaud Côté-Giguère, Bruno Roussel, and Louis Trépanier play Prologue, Fouge, et Allegro Trépidant by Patrick Roux (b.1962). Recorded live in June 2020, at Domaine Forget de Charlevoix. This comes via their YouTube channel. Great playing as always by the quartet and nice big fugue in the second movement which makes for good ensemble exchanges and a virtuosic ending. Guitar quartets can be a difficult texture to control by the CGQ always keep tight rhythmic accents and a strong sense of growth and momentum.

Movements

  • 0:07 Prologue
  • 2:47 Fougue
  • 10:30 Allegro Trépidant

 

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Easy Christmas Songs for Guitar Volume 4

This is Classical Guitar - Wed, 10/14/2020 - 15:38

Easy Christmas Songs for Guitar Volume 4 – Solo Fingerstyle Arrangements with Lyrics & Chords. Comes with two editions: Notation Edition and Notation + TAB edition. PDF Download, some minimal left hand fingering.

Songs: All Through the Night; Joy to the World; O Christmas Tree (O Tannenbaum); Angels We have Heard on High; O little Town of Bethlehem.

About This Collection – Easy Level: Melody + Bass Notes + Common Chord Shapes. These are basically just the melody with the bass note of the chords added and a few added chords here and there. These easy Christmas arrangements are for beginner or intermediate guitarists looking for sight-readable songs for the holiday season. I’ve added the lyrics and chords to make them as useful as possible in group or family settings if singing occurs. More advanced guitarists may wish to improvise or work-out intros and extra accompaniment. Otherwise, the arrangements are simple melodies plus bass notes and some filling out of common first position chords.

Easy Christmas Volume 4 (PDF Download)

Buy the Complete Set (Volumes 1-4) – Hardcopy

Video of all 5 Christmas Songs

Videos of Each Individual Christmas Song

YouTube Links:

Explore the other Christmas Volumes

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Categories: Guitar News

Fabrizio Proietti Plays Tedesco

This is Classical Guitar - Tue, 10/13/2020 - 11:27

Italian guitarist Fabrizio Proietti plays the first movement, Allegro con spirito from Sonata (Omaggio a Boccherini), Op. 77 (1934) by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895–1968). This comes via the excellent Siccas Guitars and their amazing YouTube channel. I’ve always loved this sonata so usually share it whenever I get the chance. Nice playing by Proietti with wonderful phrasing and motivic attention.

I found this nice little paragraph about the work by Graham Wade via this Naxos album:

In 1932 Andrés Segovia travelled with Manuel de Falla to the International Festival of Music in Venice. At the Festival, Segovia was introduced to Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco, the great Italian composer from Florence, who became enchanted and fascinated by the guitar and decided to explore its possibilities. Between 1932 and his death in 1968 he wrote over a hundred works for the instrument, including sets of variations, concertos, duos, impressionistic pieces of various kinds, and, among his finest solo compositions, the Sonata, Op. 77, ‘Omaggio a Boccherini’, written at Segovia’s request in 1934 for ‘a Sonata in four movements’.

Castelnuovo-Tedesco described this work as follows: ‘The Sonata is in four movements, but it is mainly in the first movement, Allegro con spirito, and in the Minuetto, that one can find the graciousness which was so characteristic of Boccherini. The Andantino, quasi canzone, on the other hand, refers to Boccherini’s ‘romantic’ mood, while the Finale: Vivo ed energico, highlights the bravura elements always present in his music.’

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Categories: Guitar News

Classical Guitar Insider Podcast Interviews Bradford Werner

This is Classical Guitar - Sat, 10/10/2020 - 11:57

Listen to the new Interview with Bradford Werner via Apple.

I had a great time chatting with Bret Williams via his amazing podcast Classical Guitar Insider where you can listen to 135 episodes of classical guitar goodness. Bret is such a great person and so much fun to talk to. We discuss a ton of topics, this website, but also alternative career paths and what’s going on in the world and our lives. Make sure you also check out Bret’s new album Seven Original Pieces for Solo Guitar which I recently reviewed.

ps. If you love his Podcast like I do consider supporting it here. I just did, maybe you can help out too.

 

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Categories: Guitar News

David Jacques Presents A Historical Guitar Collection Concert

This is Classical Guitar - Fri, 10/09/2020 - 12:34

Canadian guitarist David Jacques gives and concert and presentation of 25 historical guitars such as Torres, Lacote, pagés, Stauffer, Panormo and more in this great 65 minute video. He also discusses the guitars as intros to each video. Charming music selections as well. Amazing collection and great to see so many in one video. See his website to view his collection of historical guitars.

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Categories: Guitar News

Lesson: C Major Scale in 3rds for Guitar

This is Classical Guitar - Fri, 10/09/2020 - 12:00

C Major Scale in 3rds, Two Octaves for Classical Guitar – Scales in thirds are great for your technique, musical knowledge, and practice routine. There are an endless number of exercises for finger independence and stretching but playing scales in various intervals provides an excellent workout and adds musical context and variety. Thirds are helpful to students to remember to curve their fingers and align the left hand. They are also useful to gain some music theory knowledge on the guitar and prepare you for when thirds appear in your repertoire.

This exercise is from my book Classical Guitar Technique: Essential Exercises, Scales, and ArpeggiosThe 122 page book includes: Practice Routines, Tips, 100 Open String Exercises, 120 Giuliani Arpeggios, Scales, Slur Exercises, Shifts, Finger Independence, Barre, Tremolo, Common Harmonics, and much more. YouTube Video Link.

Solid Form interval scales can be played with any logical right hand fingering such as the few listed below. These scales are excellent for learning left hand shapes and are a great workout for two-finger independence.

Broken Form interval scales allow for a more legato sound and a one-finger-at-a-time approach. I recommend starting with the solid form and then, once you feel confident, playing in broken form.

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Categories: Guitar News

Marche Funêbre and Bolero by Bayer (Free PDF, Lesson)

This is Classical Guitar - Mon, 10/05/2020 - 13:20

Marche Funêbre and Bolero by Johann Gottfried Eduard Bayer (1822–1908). No. 21 and No.22 from his Guitarreschule. Sheet Music or Tab for Classical Guitar. Left hand fingering, PDF download. Level: early-intermediate (Grade 3-4). These two works are from German composer and guitarist Johann Gottfried Eduard Bayer’s (1822–1908) method book (Guitarreschule). I would aim for some contrast in tempos with a slower funeral march and a more active Bolero. Great student works without much difficulty but lots of musical ideas and dynamics to work with.

Free Notation Edition 

Premium Tab Edition

Video Performance and Lesson

My lesson covers how to pair and contrast the works, some of the fingering, and I do a walkthrough of the each work. YouTube Lesson Link.

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Categories: Guitar News

Suite in E Minor BWV 996 by Bach (PDF)

This is Classical Guitar - Thu, 10/01/2020 - 20:54

Suite in E Minor, BWV 996 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) – PDF sheet music for classical guitar. Popularly known as Lute Suite in E Minor. Comes with both a notation-only edition and a tab edition. Left hand fingering. PDF Download. The overall level is advanced but certain movements are easier than others. Movements: Praeludio-Presto, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande, Bourrée, Gigue.

Free Unfingered Edition (PDF) – The free unfingered edition of this work has been created so advanced players and professionals can add their own fingerings and create your own edition.

Fingered Sheet Music or Tab Edition (PDF) – Includes both notation-only edition and TAB edition.

I’ve played through this suite for years but wanted to create my own edition based on the Johann Gottfried Walther (1684–1748) manuscript while curiously looking at the Heinrich Nikolaus Gerber (1702– 1775) which are both available on IMSLP. I believe my additional unfingered edition will be of great interest to professional guitarists just as the fingered edition will be to students. Although any performance of this suite on the guitar will require some editing due to register, I wanted my score to embrace as much of the manuscript as possible.

These pieces are advanced in level and are not always idiomatic to the six string guitar. They were likely written for the lute-harpsichord (lautenwerk), an uncommon Baroque keyboard instrument. For a variety of reasons and a few surviving lute tablature manuscripts (for other similar works) the suites became popularly known as the Lute Suites. Bach was familiar with lute players of the day such as Sylvius Leopold Weiss (1687–1750) and so it is not inconceivable that he could have imagined or even intended a lute to perform the works. For this suite, in terms of the manuscript, performance difficulty, key signature, and suitability, this is a keyboard composition. However, the overall lighter texture compared to his keyboard works hints at the texture capable by a lute. Nevertheless, modern guitar players have embraced the work and have found various arranging solutions for successful performance. Any serious performer will want to consult various editors but I hope this edition is useful and engaging.

Performance Videos

Bradford’s videos using his edition will come at a later date. I do have this lesson and free sheet music for the Bouree from BWV 996 on my other previous post.

For now, enjoy these excellent performances from professional guitarists using various editions. The excellent Marcin Dylla playing the entire suite is below.

A harpsichord performance!

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Categories: Guitar News

Unfettered by Chika & Scott – Music for Saxophone and Guitar

This is Classical Guitar - Thu, 10/01/2020 - 13:01

Unfettered by Chika & Scott
Chika Inoue (Saxophone) and Scott Morris (Guitar)
chikaandscott.com
Samek Music 2020

Listen or buy from Samek Music 

Unfettered is the new release from Chika & Scott with Chika Inoue on saxophone and Scott Morris on classical guitar. You don’t hear this instrument combination very often, especially in the classical world. The pairing works well with the guitar providing the bulk of accompaniment and the saxophone covering the majority of melody. The saxophone is gloriously smooth and rich in tone, when you hear the first entry you’ll immediately be enticed. The album is a mix of Schubert and Mozart works that have a rich tradition of arrangement. I particularly enjoyed their performance of the Schubert Lieder Ständchen from his Schwanengesang D. 957. The saxophone is ultra expressive and sensitive to the vocal line while the guitar fills in the lush harmony and beautiful accompaniment. The variations on Ah vous dirai-je, Maman offers some lighter but intricate ensemble fun to break up the expressive intensity of the Schubert Arpeggione Sonata and Mozart’s Adagio in B Minor. 

Unfettered by Chika & Scott is an exciting album of saxophone and guitar arrangements filled with expressive moments of beauty and delightful ensemble work. This unlikely combo will surprise you with their arrangements of Schubert and Mozart where the saxophone’s soaring lines and the guitar’s rhythmic and rich harmonic accompaniment successfully embrace two of the greatest composers of the Classical and Romantic eras.

Repertoire

  • Schubert Arpeggione in A minor, D. 821
  • Schubert: Schwanengesang D. 957 No. 4: Ständchen (Serenade)
  • Mozart: Mozart’s Adagio in B minor, K. 540
  • Mozart: Twelve Variations on “Ah vous dirai-je, Maman”, K. 265/300e
  • Schubert: Ellens Gesang III, D. 839, Op. 52 No. 6 : Ave Maria

Album Notes

As home to the “big four” of Western Art Music which includes Ludwig von Beethoven, Franz Joseph Haydn, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Franz Schubert, Vienna’s reputation as the “City of Music” is one that is well earned. Mozart moved to Vienna in 1781 at the request of his employer, the Archduke of Salzburg, and decided to stay as a freelance composer and musician until his death. Schubert, the only member of the Big Four to be born in Vienna, was active in the city for the rest of his life.

While neither Mozart nor Schubert wrote for the saxophone or the classical guitar, the arrangements we have done imagine a reality in which they did. Adolphe Sax designed the saxophone around 1840 and the six-string “classical” guitar was emerging from the 5-course Baroque guitar by the end of the 18th century. Mozart died in 1791 at the age of 35 and Schubert in 1828 at 31 might very well have lived to see the development of these instruments and included them in their chamber works. At least this is what we would like to believe.

 

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Categories: Guitar News

Vienna Duo play Sonatina, Op. 205 by Tedesco (Flute & Guitar)

This is Classical Guitar - Mon, 09/28/2020 - 11:37

Vienna Duo with Desislava Dobreva (flute) and Bozhana Pavlova (guitar) play the first movement of Sonatina, Op. 205 (I.Allegretto grazioso) by Mario Castelnuovo-Tedesco (1895-1968). This comes via their new YouTube channel (go give them some subscribers). Filmed at Ehrbar Hall, Vienna. I found the Duo’s YouTube randomly from a YouTube suggested video and was surprised to see this is the first video on their channel. Bozhana Pavlova just completed her PhD last year and has a long list of awards. Nice to hear this Sonatina by Tedesco with excellent ensemble writing and lots of playful exchanges between the parts. Clean and musical playing by Vienna Duo, guitar and flute is such a great combo. Looking forward to hearing what they record next.

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Categories: Guitar News

Lesson: C Major Triadic Arpeggio for Guitar

This is Classical Guitar - Sat, 09/26/2020 - 17:50

C Major Triadic Arpeggio (Two Octaves) – A great all around exercise that involves plenty to think about in regards to left hand, right hand, shifts, and more.

This exercise is from my book Classical Guitar Technique: Essential Exercises, Scales, and ArpeggiosThe 122 page book includes: Practice Routines, Tips, 100 Open String Exercises, 120 Giuliani Arpeggios, Scales, Slur Exercises, Shifts, Finger Independence, Barre, Tremolo, Common Harmonics, and much more. YouTube Video Link.

Triadic Arpeggios – Triads are the three notes used in major and minor chords (formed with the 1st, 3rd, and 5th notes of a scale). Other instruments practice triadic arpeggios at early stages but guitarists often avoid them while favouring right hand patterns over common chord shapes. For the purposes of technique practice, I have made most of the arpeggios start in the first position and shift into upper positions. This often occurs in repertoire and is great practice for control, shifts, and fingering in both hands.

Right Hand Fingering – Any logical right hand fingering is acceptable. I like to use awkward string crossings with rapid m-a exchanges at the top (it’s a good thing to practice), but feel free to use other fingerings. A common solution is to use a light double rest stroke in the thumb (as shown in brackets for the first example). Using slurs can really make these easier for both hands but I’ve decided to aim for a challenging workout instead. Try to sustain notes whenever possible by keeping the left hand fingers down until needed.

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Bandini-Chiacchiaretta Duo Play Zita by Piazzolla (Guitar and Bandoneon)

This is Classical Guitar - Fri, 09/25/2020 - 12:42



The fantastic Bandini-Chiacchiaretta Duo with Giampaolo Bandini (classical guitar) and Cesare Chiacchiaretta (bandoneon) perform Zita by Argentine composer Astor Piazzolla (1921–1992). This comes via D’Addario and their YouTube Channel for their Masters in the Moment series. Great performance by Bandini-Chiacchiaretta and always nice to hear the bandoneon for Piazzolla. Super clean and rhythmic, with sharp accents and exciting momentum. Amazing performance!

 

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Review: Mundo Guitar Support & Strap

This is Classical Guitar - Thu, 09/24/2020 - 13:03

Mundo Guitar Support
and the Mundo Guitar Strap
YouTube Review Link

Learn more or buy at Mundo Music Gear 

I was very pleased to receive a Mundo Guitar Support and Strap to test out and demo. I’ve tried 15 different guitar supports and it’s been fun seeing the variety and innovative designs. I became interested in the Mundo after featuring Colombian guitarist Francisco Correa playing with one on YouTube a few weeks back (video below). Guitar supports are getting better and better every year so there are now a ton of options and styles for every player. Every support offers a different level of maneuverability, secureness, and possible angles of positioning. Finding the support that best fits your needs is the key. FYI, the non-adhesive protective and suction enhancing vinyl material I mention in the video is a non-guitar one called Grafix ClingViynl. The black cloth/foam seen in the video on my leg to keep the guitar from slipping is the Shelf Liner. Alternatively you could use the additional belt suction cup from the strap system for the same purpose.

I like the Mundo support and I have no criticisms, it really just comes down to personal preference. Its high level of versatile movement and that awesome magnet are big wins here and the option of converting it to the Mundo Strap system is a brilliant bonus. The strap system is not something I personally will use everyday, but it would be perfect for certain performance situations where you want to stand up and interact with the audience or move around a gig from table to table. It could also be very useful in theatre, opera, and performance art situations. Many people may like the strap while sitting as well. They also make an Mundo Airpannier, an ergonomic and safe way to carry musical instruments on bicycles. The innovative design and simplicity of the support is a welcomed addition to the guitar world.

In terms of competition I think the Mundo tops the somewhat similar Murata support, although I haven’t tried the new Murata suction cup option. The Murata has too many little bolts and tighteners for me and I think suction cups on the back of the guitar work better. I still love my Gitano and Tenuto supports for ultimate simplicity and small compact design but I’m yet to trust them outside the practice or rehearsal room. Mundo’s biggest competitor will be the GuitarLift which I’ve also reviewed and have been using a ton these days. The GuitarLift feels more supported and secure than any guitar support I’ve tried but has less maneuverability and doesn’t not fold up nicely for easy transport as the Mundo does. The GuitarLift will also not fit the variety of small instruments with its widely spaced suction cups or give you the Mundo strap option. That said, having the perfect tool is more important than versatility in some cases. Some players will favour stability over maneuverability so personal preference will be the deciding factor.

Pros of the Mundo Guitar Support

  • High level of maneuverability, the magnetic pivot allows an amazing range of movement angles, and positioning.
  • Back mounted suction cups make positioning and height adjustments very versatile and it seems to stay suctioned on nicely.
  • The small surface area needed for the 3 cups makes the support usable on small instruments and a wider possibility of placements.
  • Large foam pad under leg platform stops the support from slipping on the leg.
  • Each part is detachable for easy and compact transport
  • Optional usage of the Mundo Strap system (see end of my video or their video below)
  • Colour options include natural wood (seen here) or black

Cons of Mundo Support

  • Not everyone will want maneuverability and might favour the security of supports such as the Guitarlift or HB Support. That said, I found playing in a static position quite supportive, easy, and not a problem at all.
  • The leg pad/platform seems a bit big but you probably want that for comfort and so it doesn’t slip off or slide around.
  • Although it’s necessary that the suction cup head piece be removable for the strap system and easy transport, I’d personally prefer that it locked in more securely. It came out once when I got up and did some weird (edited the video across the room while holding my guitar). I think I accidentally yanked on it so this would never happen in performance but maybe a locking mechanism would be welcome. However, it never once came off when playing.

Mundo Promo Video and Strap Instructional

Colombian guitarist Francisco Correa plays Bambuco in E minor by Colombian composer Adolfo Mejía (1905-1973). This comes via his YouTube channel.

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Categories: Guitar News

Sanel Redžić Plays Suite BWV 995 by Bach

This is Classical Guitar - Mon, 09/21/2020 - 11:20

Sanel Redžić plays Suite BWV 995 by Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750). This comes via Redžić’s fantastic and very active YouTube channel. Recorded in Schottenkirche Erfurt, Germany. I love Redžić’s balanced playing, musical but also rhythmic and well-paced. I’ve been working of editions of the ‘lute’ suites and its amazing how much editing is needed in some of them when transferring to the modern guitar. If you didn’t already know, this one is Bach’s arrangement from his own Cello Suite No. 5, BWV 1011 and transfers to guitar better than most of the suites.

Video Movement Times
00:36 Prelude – Tres Viste
07:17 Allemande
14:12 Courante
16:48 Sarabande
20:50 Gavotte I & Gavotte 2 En Rondeaux
25:28 Gigue

My edition will be coming eventually but for now I’d recommend the good ol’ Koonce edition which you’d want for comparison anyway: Lute Works of Johann Sebastian Bach

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Lesson: Skipping Strings Right Hand Exercise

This is Classical Guitar - Fri, 09/18/2020 - 11:57

This exercise is from my book Classical Guitar Technique: Essential Exercises, Scales, and ArpeggiosThe 122 page book includes: Practice Routines, Tips, 100 Open String Exercises, 120 Giuliani Arpeggios, Scales, Slur Exercises, Shifts, Finger Independence, Barre, Tremolo, Common Harmonics, and much more. YouTube Video Link.

This is exercise No.11 (on page 14) from my 100 open string exercises in my technique book. Practicing open string exercises allows you to focus solely on the right hand and really examine your right hand technique. You might think these exercises are easy but you need to ask yourself: Can I play basic exercises as well as a professional guitarist? Is my tone good? Could my legato sound be better? Am I truly relaxed and accurate when I play?

Always alternate the fingers in all the combos and practice with both rest and free stroke:

  • Two finger combinations: i-m / m-i / m-a / a-m / i-a / a-i
  • Three Finger Combinations: a-m-i / a-i-m / m-i-a / m-a-i / i-a-m / i-m-a

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Anton Baranov plays Gran Fantasia de Concierto ‘La Triunfal’ by Sagreras

This is Classical Guitar - Thu, 09/17/2020 - 11:52

Russian guitarist Anton Baranov plays Gran Fantasia de Concierto ‘La Triunfal’, Op.107 by Argentine composer/guitarist by Julio Sagreras (1879 -1942). This comes via Baranov’s YouTube channel. Brilliant playing as usual by Baranov. Great contrasts between extroverted virtuosity and sensitive and flowing phrasing in the melodic sections. Here’s his YouTube description which is great:

Let me tell you a story. Many years ago the guitarist Jovan Jovovic from former Yugoslavia was touring Soviet Union. His encore was a ‘holy moly’ piece called ‘El Colibri’. Since then in Soviet Union and modern Russia Julio Sagreras has been known only by this short piece of music, which is ridiculous, cos one of the pure guitar stars of La Plata region of the first half of the 20 cent, such as Julio Sagreras, deserves a better position today. In order to fix it, I recorded Sagreras’ bigger work called Grand Fantasia de Concierto ‘La Triunfal’.

 

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Categories: Guitar News

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